What is it?

generic-viagraVIAGRA contains the active ingredient sildenafil, which belongs to a group of medicines called phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5).
The effect of VIAGRA is to assist in the expansion of blood vessels in the penis, allowing blood to flow during sexual excitement.
VIAGRA will only help you to get an erection if you are sexually stimulated.
VIAGRA is a treatment for adult men with erectile dysfunction, sometimes known as impotence. This means that man can not get, or keep a hard, erect penis suitable for sexual intercourse.

2. What you should know before taking VIAGRA
Do not take VIAGRA
– If you are allergic to sildenafil or any of the other ingredients of this medicine (listed in section 6).
– If you are taking medicines called nitrates, as the combination may cause a potentially dangerous drop in your blood pressure. Tell your doctor if you are taking any of these medicines which are often given for relief of angina pectoris (or “chest pain”). If you are unsure, ask your doctor or pharmacist.
– If you use one of the drugs known as nitric oxide donors such as amyl nitrite (“poppers”), as the combination may also lead to a potentially dangerous drop in blood pressure.
– If you have severe heart or liver problem.
– If you have recently had a stroke or heart attack, or if you have low blood pressure.
– If you have certain rare inherited eye diseases (such as retinitis pigmentosa).
– If you have ever had loss of vision due to non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION).
Warnings and Precautions
Talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse before taking VIAGRA:
– If you have sickle cell anemia (an abnormality of red blood cells), leukemia (cancer of blood cells), multiple myeloma (bone marrow cancer).
– If you have a deformity of your penis or Peyronie’s disease.
– If you have heart problems. Your doctor should carefully check whether your heart can take the additional strain of having sex.
– If you currently have a stomach ulcer or problems with blood clotting (such as haemophilia).
– If you experience sudden decrease or loss of vision, stop taking VIAGRA and immediately contact your doctor.
VIAGRA should not be used concomitantly with other oral or topical treatment for erectile dysfunction.
You should not take VIAGRA, if you suffer from erectile dysfunction.
You should not take VIAGRA, if you are a woman.
Special considerations for patients with kidney or liver problems
You should tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver problems. Your doctor may decide to prescribe a lower dose.
Children and adolescents
VIAGRA should not be administered to persons under 18 years of age.
Other medicines and VIAGRA
Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking, have recently taken or might take any other medicines.
VIAGRA tablets may interact with some drugs, particularly those used to treat chest pain. In case of emergency, you should tell your doctor, pharmacist or nurse that you have taken VIAGRA and when you did. Do not take VIAGRA with other medicines unless your doctor tells you that you can.
You should not take VIAGRA, if you are taking medicines called nitrates as the combination of these drugs can cause a potentially dangerous drop in your blood pressure. Always tell your doctor, pharmacist or nurse if you are taking any of these medicines which are often given for relief of angina pectoris (or “chest pain”).
You should not use VIAGRA, if you are using any of the drugs known as nitric oxide donors such as amyl nitrite (“poppers”), as the combination may also lead to a potentially dangerous drop in blood pressure.
If you are taking medicines known as protease inhibitors, such as for the treatment of HIV, your doctor probably will prescribe a start at the lowest dose (25 mg tablets) VIAGRA.
Some patients who are treated with alpha blocker to treat high blood pressure or prostate enlargement may experience dizziness or fainting which can be caused by low blood pressure upon sitting or standing up quickly. Some patients have experienced these symptoms when taking VIAGRA with alpha-blockers. This is most likely to occur within 4 hours after taking VIAGRA. You must be on a regular daily dose of alpha-blocker before taking VIAGRA, to reduce the risk of possible occurrence of these symptoms. Your doctor may start you on a lower dose (25 mg tablets) VIAGRA.
VIAGRA with alcohol
Drinking alcohol can temporarily impair your ability to get an erection. To get the maximum benefit from your medication, you are advised not to drink excessive amounts of alcohol before taking VIAGRA.
Pregnancy, lactation and fertility
VIAGRA is not indicated for use in women.
Driving and using machines
VIAGRA can cause dizziness and can affect vision. You need to know how you react to VIAGRA before you drive or operate machinery.

3. How to take VIAGRA
Always take this medicine exactly as you have been told by your doctor or pharmacist. If you’re not sure, ask your doctor or pharmacist.
The recommended starting dose is 50 – 100 mg. You should not take VIAGRA more than once a day.
Do not take VIAGRA orodispersible tablets in combination with film-coated tablets containing sildenafil, including VIAGRA tablets.
VIAGRA should be taken about one hour before you plan to have sex. Time that occurs the effect of VIAGRA, varies from individual to individual, but is usually between half and one hour.
Place the orodispersible tablet in the mouth on the tongue, where it will dissolve in seconds, then swallow with saliva or water.
Orodispersible tablet in the mouth must be taken on an empty stomach, as you may find that an effect requires a long time if you take the tablet with a sumptuous meal.
If you need a second orodispersible tablet to supplement the dose of 100 mg, you must wait until the first fall completely apart and swallowing it, as only then you can take the second orodispersible tablet.
If you think that the effect of VIAGRA is too strong or too weak, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.
VIAGRA will only help you to get an erection if sexual stimulation.
If VIAGRA does not help you to get an erection or if your erection does not last long enough to complete sexual intercourse you should tell your doctor.